Review of Snow and climate: physical processes, surface energy exchange and modeling, edited by Richard L Armstrong & Eric Brun

  • Stephen J. Déry

Abstract

At its peak extent, snow can cover more than 40% of the Northern Hemisphere land surface, greatly affecting surface exchange processes, and hence global climate. Snow is one of the most dynamic surface types and its distinct physical properties imply that it requires special attention when modelling short-term weather conditions and long-term climate. Natural hazards such as avalanches, reduced visibility from blowing snow, and snowmelt-induced flooding all necessitate the precise monitoring and modelling of snowpack evolution and attendant atmospheric conditions. It is therefore critical that we develop a better understanding of snow accumulation/ablation processes and their impacts on climate.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Published
2010-12-01
How to Cite
Déry, S. (2010). Review of <em>Snow and climate: physical processes, surface energy exchange and modeling</em&gt;, edited by Richard L Armstrong & Eric Brun. Polar Research, 29(3), 461-462. https://doi.org/10.3402/polar.v29i3.6091
Section
Book reviews