The role of atmospheric precipitation in introducing contaminants to the surface waters of the Fuglebekken catchment, Spitsbergen

  • Katarzyna Kozak Department of Analytical Chemistry, The Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza St., Gdansk 80-233, Poland
  • Krystyna Kozioł Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Winter Street, Sheffield S10 2TN,
  • Bartłomiej Luks Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Ksiecia Janusza 64 St., Warsaw 01-452 , Poland
  • Stanisław Chmiel Faculty of Earth Sciences and Land Management, Maria Sklodowska -Curie University , 2 C-D Krasnicka St., 20-718 Lublin, Poland
  • Marek Ruman Faculty of Earth Sciences, University of Silesia, 60 Bedzinska St., Sosnowiec 41-200, Poland Centre for Polar Studies KNOW (Leading National Research Centre), Bedzinska 60 St., 41-200 Sosnowiec, Poland
  • Mariusz Marć Department of Analytical Chemistry, The Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza St., Gdansk 80-233, Poland
  • Jacek Namieśnik Department of Analytical Chemistry, The Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza St., Gdansk 80-233, Poland
  • Żaneta Polkowska Department of Analytical Chemistry, The Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 Narutowicza St., Gdansk 80-233, Poland
Keywords: Arctic, environmental chemistry, trace elements, metals, TOC, Svalbard

Abstract

Although the Svalbard Archipelago is located at a high latitude, far from potential contaminant sources, it is not free from anthropogenic impact. Towards the Fuglebekken catchment, in the southern part of Spitsbergen, north of Hornsund fjord, contaminants can be transported from mainland pollution sources. In the precipitation and surface water collected in the catchment, the following elements were detected and quantified: Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Cs, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn. Additionally, pH, electrical conductivity and total organic carbon (TOC) were determined in those samples. The acidic reaction of precipitation waters was identified as an important factor intensifying the metal migration in this Arctic tundra environment. The air mass trajectory, surprisingly, explained the variability of only a small fraction of trace elements in precipitation water. The air mass origin area was correlated only with the concentrations of As, V and Cr. Wind directions were helpful in explaining the variability of Mn, U and Ba concentrations (east–north-easterly wind) and the contents of B, As, Rb, Se, Sr and Li in precipitation (south-westerly wind), which may indicate the local geological source of those. Atmospheric deposition was found to play a key role in the transport of contaminants into the Fuglebekken catchment; however, the surface water composition was modified by its pH and TOC content.

Keywords: Arctic; environmental chemistry; trace elements; metals; TOC; Svalbard.

(Published: 23 November 2015)

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Citation: Polar Research 2015, 34, 24207, http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/polar.v34.24207

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Published
2015-11-23
How to Cite
Kozak, K., Kozioł, K., Luks, B., Chmiel, S., Ruman, M., Marć, M., Namieśnik, J., & Polkowska, Żaneta. (2015). The role of atmospheric precipitation in introducing contaminants to the surface waters of the Fuglebekken catchment, Spitsbergen. Polar Research, 34. https://doi.org/10.3402/polar.v34.24207
Section
Research/review articles